Mayumi Sarai

New York Lori Bookstein Fine Art Mayumi Sarai is a Japanese-born sculptor who trained at the Nihon University College of Art in Tokyo and at the New York Studio School. Currently, she pursues her career as a carver in Bayonne, New Jersey, and Colchester, New York.

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Judy Onofrio

Minneapolis Thomas Barry Fine Arts Judy Onofrio’s recent exhibition, “Full Circle,” marked a significant and radical departure in both materials and aesthetics from her flamboyant work of the last three decades. Whereas her earlier figurative sculpture, wall reliefs, and installations—some of grand scale—were theatrical, even operatic assemblages, the “Full Circle” works consist largely of vessel

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Leslie Wilcox

Boston Boston Sculptors Gallery Leslie Wilcox’s signature material has long been metal screening, the ordinary kind used to cover windows in summer. She built her career on quasi-figurative works made out of it, empty dresses and the like, generally suggesting people but not in any literal way.

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Kyoko Hazama

Delray Beach, Florida Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens “From a Quiet Place: The Paper Sculptures of Kyoko Hazama” was organized by Susanna Brooks, the Morikami Museum’s curator of Japanese art. The Morikami, which collects and exhibits Japanese art, is thoughtfully designed, grounded by concepts that govern traditional architecture in Japan, but reinterpreted to reflect a

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Helen Pashgian

Los Angeles Los Angeles County Museum of Art The darkened rectangular chamber on the entry level of the Art of the Americas Building at LACMA was illuminated by a series of 12 columns running down its center in a straight line.

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Scott Ingram

Atlanta Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia Scott Ingram’s “Blue Collar Modern­ism” included collage sketches, paintings, and sculptural installations that underscore his interest in modern architecture and functional building materials. Following the exhibition title, the work made a promise to explore aspects of Mod­ern­ism that are often conflated and at times contradictory—on the one hand,

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“Lines”

Zurich Hauser & Wirth “Lines” featured a positively intellectual body of non-works that appeared to want to disappear from view. Beneath curved steel ribs rising up into the ceiling, the industrial-style space of Hauser & Wirth might have been completely empty were it not for the wafer-thin works and barely visible thread installations that resonated

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Tunga

New York Luhring Augustine Gallery Tunga’s intention to generate astonishment and perplexity was more than fulfilled in his fifth exhibition at Luhring Augustine. Abounding with evocations of human shapes, forms, meanings, and connections, “La Voie Humide” created an arena for free-flowing associations.

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“New Art Archaeology”

Acton, Massachusetts The Quarry Just beyond a new cookie-cutter housing development, the woods of semi-rural Acton, Massachusetts, open up into an astonishing sight: an assortment of contemporary sculptures made from wire, granite, and repurposed old machines.

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Nobuo Sekine

Los Angeles Blum & Poe A seminal figure in the Mono-ha movement, Nobuo Sekine is particularly associated with its emergence, which was marked by his large-scale earthwork Phase—Mother Earth (1968). For this work, he dug a cylindrical hole in the ground, approximately seven feet wide and nine feet deep; then he placed the excavated earth,

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