Reviews


Dorothy Dehner

NEW YORK Berry Campbell Gallery Dehner’s sculpture can be viewed within the framework of postwar Modernism. All of the influences brought to bear on American artists of the time can be seen in her work—Surrealism, Constructivism, and abstraction, as well as avant-garde dance and music.

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Gary Simmons

MIAMI Peréz Art Museum The artist’s questioning of how our shared past is remembered and which histories we’ve been taught to forget—why and by whom, and what is at stake—was especially timely in its presentation in a state whose governor and extremists have been leading the charge for the destruction of education and a war on truth through censorship, book banning, and whitewashing how American history is taught.

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Ryan Villamael

SINGAPORE AND MANILA Esplanade Singapore and Silverlens Gallery Villamael inflects spaces, locations, and structures. Like a form of drawing in space, his work is sculpture and non-sculpture; architecture and non-architecture.

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Suki Seokyeong Kang

NEW YORK Tina Kim Gallery Chunaengmu dancers may have been confined to their mats like birds in cages, but as Kang sees it, they also enacted singular, bold gestures that defied status and allowed them to look royalty right in the eye.

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Antony Gormley

NEW YORK White Cube Like a three-dimensional Mondrian painting through which one can move—navigating the horizontal and vertical branches that pierce the space—the work forces viewers to stop and carefully pick a path.

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Tatiana Wolska

BIRMINGHAM, U.K. Midlands Arts Centre Tatiana Wolska’s intuitive, materially driven practice is founded on clear political and ethical principles. The Polish artist takes an open, democratic approach to art-making, inviting viewers to activate the exhibition space through participation and exchange.

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Sinead McKeever

BELFAST QSS Gallery It would seem that McKeever’s ambitions escalate according to the size of the space she is offered. At QSS’s new, large-scale gallery—roughly triangular with two protruding corridor sections and a small zig-zag area—she took on the entire, oddly shaped space.

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Celia Pym

PENZANCE, CORNWALL, ENGLAND Hweg Gallery Like contemporaries in London such as Caroline Achaintre, who shoots wool through canvas with an air compressor to make her work, Pym is taking materials and processes traditionally associated with the applied arts into a contemporary art practice that can be said to occupy a new space between traditional definitions.

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Kehinde Wiley

HOUSTON Museum of Fine Arts Nearly all of the figures in the exhibition are deceased, wounded, or in repose, in striking contrast to Wiley’s previous works in which his subjects are (almost) invariably dynamic, assertive, and commanding.

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Kelly Akashi

SEATTLE Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington Fired into inertia, despite their malleable clay origins, the sculptures have a static, rigid quality, reinforced by the bronze and glass casts. In this sense, they are more ecological memorials than myths of origins.

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