A.A. Murakami

LONDON Superblue Silent Fall is the sort of installation that engulfs and dislodges the sense of self, which is appropriate considering that it draws on Adam and Eve’s expulsion from the Garden of Eden, offering a contemporary take on the Fall as we teeter on the brink of environmental catastrophe.

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Firelei Báez

BOSTON ICA Watershed Firelei Báez, the third artist invited to create a site-specific work for the ICA’s East Boston annex, was the first to use the space successfully, taking the history of the location as a pivotal point of reference.

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Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

SAN FRANCISCO SFMOMA Truly experiencing Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s work requires us to pay close attention: to make our minds and imaginations available in ways dangerously eroded by the distractions of the Internet. This is somewhat paradoxical, considering the technological complexity of his installations.

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Guadalupe Maravilla

LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW YORK Socrates Sculpture Park Guadalupe Maravilla’s “Planeta Abuelx” at Socrates Sculpture Park provided a welcome respite for pandemic times. Offering a space for meditation, healing, and recovery, the project reflected Maravilla’s engagement with mutual aid and therapy, focusing on the ways that art can sustain, restore, and provide solace.

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Judy Pfaff

PROVINCETOWN, MASSACHUSETTS Gaa Gallery Though filled with Pfaff’s typical energy, “opsins” is infused with a glowing vibrancy and color unusual for her frenetic forms. The exhibition hinges on gradations across light, color, and darkness, making it one of Pfaff’s most joyful bodies of work to date.

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Sreshta Rit Premnath

CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS MIT List Visual Arts Center Premnath combines a Minimalist context with Arte Povera sociopolitical influences, conveying a narrative that invites reflection on the psychic weight of waiting in relation to the exclusionary experiences of displacement, incarceration, immigration, and disability.

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Rachel Kneebone

LONDON White Cube Mason’s Yard Seen in conjunction with the drawings, the sculptures became balletic, taking an unexpected turn away from the tragedy that inspired them. The overspilling, extended limbs, now recalling the stylized grace of synchronized swimmers, created an uncanny tension—as in Géricault’s painting—between the sublime and the monstrous, hope and despair, order and chaos.

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